Sunday, August 1, 2021

The New Interactivity and the New/Old Technology

Editorial by Judith Rubin,
IPM editor

judyrubinThe symbiosis of design and technology was never more apparent in our industry than it is now. Designers and tech specialists sit side by side on creative teams, working closely together from the early stages of a project. And creativity is everywhere. The ideas for how to apply a technology can come from many sources: the design firm that brings a fresh perspective, the integrator that recognizes compatibilities and solutions, the manufacturer that knows it intimately.

[quote]Companies are becoming much more active and pro-active about influencing how their products are used. When they follow up by sharing those examples with the professional community, inspiration and more creativity result. Digital technology breaks down barriers in more ways than one.”[/quote]

Our cover story about Gantom technology reflects that – but there are other examples, such as Harman’s new business vertical devoted to themed entertainment, which is covered in our InfoComm report. Harman has many relationships with designers, suppliers and integrators – but they will also interact directly with the end user. Companies are becoming much more active and pro-active about influencing how their products are used. When they follow up by sharing those examples with the professional community, inspiration and more creativity result. Digital technology breaks down barriers in more ways than one.

Sometimes what’s called a new technology is really just a new application of existing technology – a fresh approach to its use, fueled by advances either in the technology itself or essential components, greater affordability or availability, ease of use, ease of integration with other technologies or the elimination of some past barrier to public or industry acceptance. Industry veterans may have to shake off previous notions and put on their fresh eyes when something comes around for the second or third time. Dome projection, 3D, VR, AR and IR, real-time image generation and many more such are coming of age. Interactivity has leapt beyond pressing a button or touching a screen – now we have entire environments that respond magically, in real time, as if they were alive.

Joe Kleimanhttp://www.themedreality.com
Raised in San Diego on theme parks, zoos, and IMAX films, Joe Kleiman would expand his childhood loves into two decades as a projectionist and theater director within the giant screen industry. In addition to his work in commercial and museum operations, Joe has volunteered his time to animal husbandry at leading facilities in California and Texas and has played a leading management role for a number of performing arts companies. Joe has been News Editor and contributing author to InPark Magazine since 2011. HIs writing has also appeared in Sound & Communications, LF Examiner, Jim Hill Media, and MiceChat. His blog, ThemedReality.com takes an unconventional look at the attractions industry. Follow on twitter @themedreality Joe lives in Sacramento, California with his fiancé, two dogs, and a ghost.

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